Fairtrade Blog

  • cup of tea, leaves and tea pot

    Good cuppa - 10 facts about Fairtrade tea

    14 December 2016 by Anna Galandzij for the Fairtrade Foundation

    What does a good cup of tea mean to you? With the average Briton drinking 876 cups of tea a year, this clearly is a valid question and one to ponder on International Tea Day.

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  • Air

    10 things you might not know about Fairtrade in 2015-16

    20 July 2016 by Rachel Wadham, Impact and Stakeholder Communications Manager at the Fairtrade Foundation

    What is the Fairtrade Climate Standard? How many farmers and workers are now part of the Fairtrade movement? We round up 10 things you might not know about Fairtrade in the last year.

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  • flowers

    Blooming futures of flower workers and their families

    12 May 2016 by Jennifer Shepherd, Flower Supply Chain Manager

    This week Lidl becomes the latest UK supermarket to offer its customers Fairtrade flowers as it launches a range of roses from Tanzania in all its stores across the country.  This new range* will see Fairtrade flowers blooming on the high street alongside those sold in Sainsbury’s, the Co-op, Aldi, Morrisons, M&S, Asda and Tesco. Jennifer Shepherd looks at the many positives Fairtrade flowers have already brought to poor communities.

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  • living wage

    The need for wage rich prices

    18 December 2014 by Wilbert Flinterman, Senior Advisor on Workers’ Rights and Trade Union Relations at Fairtrade International, and Tim Aldred, Head of Policy and Research at Fairtrade Foundation (UK).

    In 1819, UK MPs were debating a new law to outlaw the employment of very young children as chimney sweeps. Several MPs (apparently after lobbying from the Guild of Master Chimney Sweepers) raised concerns that sweepers would turn to mechanisation. They argued that the law would “deprive many people of employment, and throw a number of young persons on the parishes.”1  Better, said the opponents, to employ a large number of children - in very poor working conditions, than to offer them no work at all.

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