20 July, 2016

10 things you might not know about Fairtrade in 2015-16

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by Rachel Wadham, Impact and Stakeholder Communications Manager at the Fairtrade Foundation

What is the Fairtrade Climate Standard? How many farmers and workers are now part of the Fairtrade movement? We round up 10 things you might not know about Fairtrade in the last year.

 

Back in March, I met Patrick Kaberia Muthaura, who visited the UK during Fairtrade Fortnight to share his experiences of life as a tea farmer in Kenya. We spent many hours talking about the difference that Fairtrade has made for him and for people in his community. He said his trip to the UK had changed him, because he had seen an energy and enthusiasm from consumers, campaigners and volunteers that he had never known was such a big part of Fairtrade.

This made me think that there’s probably many things about Fairtrade that people might not know. When I sit down each year to write our impact report, I’m often overwhelmed by the volume of information about the work that has happened in Fairtrade across the year, both here in the UK and across the globe.

So, here’s ten things you might not know about Fairtrade in 2015-16:

1. Fairtrade sales in the UK generated £29.8 million in Fairtrade Premium for farmers and workers to invest in business or community projects. And there are now more than 1.65 million farmers and workers in 74 countries that are part of Fairtrade.

 

2. Mars bars in the UK now contain Fairtrade cocoa!

 

3. We supported thousands of migrant banana workers in the Dominican Republic to register for work permits to gain legal status.

 

4. Women cocoa farmers in Côte d'Ivoire created a film sharing their experiences while we launched a new gender strategy.

 

5. With the support of Fairtrade, Traidcraft set up the first rice supply chain in Myanmar, just one of many projects with businesses that are working to deepen impact for farmers and workers.

 

6. The Co-operative were the first supermarket to commit to selling 100 percent Fairtrade bagged sugar.

 

7. We launched the Fairtrade Climate Standard to support smallholder farmers to face the challenges of climate change.

 

8. We are working with 20 organisations in Malawi to improve the tea industry so that workers earn a living wage and farmers earn a living income.

 

9. A new All-Party Parliamentary Group for Fairtrade is boosting political support in Westminster.

 

10. 53,000 people took an online pledge to eat a Fairtrade breakfast during Fairtrade Fortnight, alongside thousands of community events across the country.

In Our Impact Story 2015-16, you can read stories of change seen through the eyes of the people who are at the heart of Fairtrade – that means change for farmers and workers, change for Fairtrade and the changes we want to see in the future through our five-year strategy. And we hope that you will want to be part of our story in the future.

 

Comments

  • Anthony Thomas said:
    28/07/2016 15:28

    Encouraging news. But there is so much more to do the bring sanity and real justice to our world.

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